Cold Comfort Ice Cream: Creative Ice Cream Recipes from Snowy New England

Archive for the ‘Fruit Flavors’ Category

Even better than Black Raspberry!

I decided to make this flavor after a bumper crop of fresh blackberries came into all of my local grocery stores, yielding pints and pints of fresh, juicy, inky black berries on sale for only 99 cents a pint. So what to do with them all? Make tasty homemade ice cream of course! Part of the many charms of DIY ice cream is that you can make flavors that are nearly impossible to find commercially. Blackberry ice cream is one such flavor. Sure black raspberry is readily available, but do you really think it’s made with real, wholesome, honest to goodness black raspberries? In most cases I highly doubt it. Not only does the homemade kind have real, natural ingredients but the taste is superior as well. A beauty both to look at and to eat.

Quick Skillet Jam

When I first started to make fruit ice creams, I followed certain recipes that instructed me to simply mix pureed fruit right into the ice cream base. In my opinion, I think this method yields an icy finished product. You see, water is the enemy of ice cream. Added water to your base will diminsh creaminess and produce an icy result every time. This is tricky when it comes to making fruit based ice creams because fruit inherently contains a lot of water. My solution? The quick skillet jam. By making a jam I boil the troublesome water out of the fruit while concentrating the flavors of it simultaneously. Then, right before you put it into the ice cream maker, I add a small amount of pureed fruit for freshness.

You've got to love lavendar ice cream!

Please don’t be afraid to make a skillet jam!  Trust me, it’s fall off a log simple. You just mash up the berries a bit, through em’ in a pan with some sugar and booze, and simmer over low heat until jam-like.  No scary canning, sealing or boiling required. The jam won’t keep as long as a properly canned preserves would, but it you really don’t need it to. This jam is made for a higher purpose- providing sweet, sweet flavor to your homemade ice cream!

A great way to kick off summer!

Blackberry Ice Cream is a perfect flavor for summer, and this recipe came out beautifully. The texture was actually velvety with a creamy, fruity flavor. Do think of this pretty little dessert next time berries are on sale at your local supermarket. Or whenever the mood strikes!

Blackberry Ice Cream Recipe

Ingredients:

12 oz. blackberries, divided

2 cups half and half

3/4 cup sugar, divided

3 large egg yolks

pinch of salt

½ teaspoon vanilla extract

2 tablespoons Grand Marnier liquor, or other liquor compatible with blackberries

1.) To make the easy skillet jam, combine 9 oz of the blackberries, ½ cup of the sugar, and 1 tablespoon Grand Marnier in a medium pan; bring to a boil. Reduce heat; simmer until reduced, with a jam-like consistency (about 30-40 minutes), stirring occasionally. Add in the remaining tablespoon of Grand Marnier and remove from heat. Spoon into a container; cool to room temperature.

2.) Place remaining fresh blackberries in food processor. Pulse until blended. Strain puree through a sieve to get rid of extraneous seeds.

3.) Combine half and half in a medium saucepan and set over medium heat. Heat until bubbles appear near the rim of the saucepan and steam begins to rinse, but do not let it boil.

4.)    Meanwhile whisk the egg yolks together in a large bowl and gradually add the remaining ¼ cup sugar. Whisk the mixture until the yolks look fluffy and turn a pale yellow color.

5.)    All the while whisking the egg yolk mixture, slowly and gradually add the half and half and when fully emulsified, pour the mixture back into the medium saucepan. Over low heat constantly mix the base with a spatula or wooden spoon until it thickens slightly and can coat the back of a wooden spoon, about 6 minutes.

6.)    Immediately remove from heat and transfer to a large bowl. Add the pinch of salt, vanilla extract, blackberry puree and blackberry jam, whisking well to blend. Refrigerate 4 hours to overnight. Freeze according to your ice cream machine’s instructions. Enjoy!

Make it a sundae!

While I think this ice cream is stand alone delicious, I think it would taste lovely with a white chocolate hot fudge sauce drizzled on top. Blackberries and white chocolate are a tried and true delicious flavor combo. Emeril Lagasse makes a tasty looking white chocolate sauce here:

http://www.emerils.com/recipe/1556/White-Chocolate-Sauce

Advertisements

My whole family flipped for this!

Again, I took this recipe from David Lebovitz’s masterful cookbook on all things frozen, The Perfect Scoop. Even though it uses just a bit of whole milk and a smattering of butter, this ice cream came out remarkably creamy. In fact, I think the lack of fats really allowed the sumptuous flavors of oven roasted bananas and caramelized brown sugar to take center stage. The dot of butter actually went quite a long way, combining beautifully with the brown sugar to create a sweet-salty butterscotch flavor. The members of my family on diets went wild for this recipe, and we all polished it off in one sitting.

The three bananas left in the house...

I decided to make this when I wanted to make a new ice cream, but I didn’t have enough milk, cream or eggs to make the proper, custard style variety. Being too lazy to go out to the store, I decided to stick it out and scrounge around the house for ingredients to make some kind of frozen treat. When I saw the three bananas on sitting in a bowl on my kitchen table, I immediately remembered David Lebovitz’s Roasted Banana Ice Cream. I made it last year, and it was equally delicious then as it is now.

Getting ready for roasting.

This ice cream was pretty easy to make. Just chop up some bananas, add some brown sugar and melted butter and then pop the whole thing in the oven to roast. I would advise checking it frequently. David Lebovitz suggesting roasting the bananas for 40 minutes, but mine were done in 30. So check frequently and stir often to prevent a whole different kind of burnt caramel!

Fresh from the churn!

This ice cream was so awesome, one family member told me that I should package it and start a line of low-fat, insanely tasty banana based ice creams. I don’t know if I’m going to do that (I think David Lebovitz might have something to say about it!), but it was exceptionally good. Especially if you are on a diet and looking for a fairly healthy treat. This is honestly as good as it’s going to get and frankly, better than many full fat ice cream flavors I’ve made.

Roasted Banana Ice Cream

Adapted from David Lebovitz’s cookbook, The Perfect Scoop, 2007.

Ingredients:

3 medium-sized ripe bananas, peeled

1/3 cup packed light brown sugar

1 tbsp. butter (salted or unsalted), cut into small pieces

1 1/2 cups whole milk

 2 tablespoons granulated sugar

1/2 tsp. vanilla extract

1 1/2 teaspoons freshly squeezed lemon juice

½ tsp. coarse salt

1.) Preheat the oven to 400°.

 2.) Slice the bananas into ½ -inch pieces and toss them with the brown sugar and butter in a 2-quart baking dish.  Bake for 40 minutes, stirring just once during baking, until the bananas are browned and cooked through.

 3.) Scrape the bananas and the thick syrup in the baking dish into a blender or food processor.  Add the milk, granulated sugar, vanilla, lemon juice, and salt, and puree until smooth. 

 4.) Chill the mixture thoroughly in the refrigerator, then freeze it in your ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions.  If the chilled mixture is too thick to pour into your machine, whisking will thin it out.

Make it a Sundae!- This would be a great ice cream to use in a banana split! Use three scoops of this with chocolate sauce, strawberry sauce and marshmallow. Add a split banana, whipped cream, toasted walnuts for crunch and a maraschino cherry on top. An updated and great twist on classic!

So delicious!

I never intended on making Bananas Foster Ice Cream. I had originally wanted to make Ginger Ice Cream, but that poor frozen treat came to untimely end, unfortunately. My ice cream curdled on me, and I was left with no more ingredients to start over with. So, thinking on my feet, I scrounged together the ingredients I had lying around in my kitchen and decided to make a Burnt-Sugar Banana Ice Cream. It sounds good right? Well, it was! And not only was it tasty, it ended up tasting just like Banana’s Foster, that decadent treat combining bananas, brown sugar and butter until caramelized. So in the end, I snatched victory from the jaws of defeat. Who needs Ginger Ice Cream anyway?

Burnt sugar and bananas!

This ice cream was super simple to make. The hardest part was probably making the burnt sugar. You add some sugar and water to a medium pan and boil it until the sugar turns dark brown. That’s the trickiest part. Because if you take the caramel off the heat too soon, you’re left with plain old caramel, which is OK but not the flavor we’re looking for here. If you leave it on too long, you’ll end up with a black caramel which will leave your ice cream with a burnt, acrid flavor. Wait until the sugar has turned a dark brown color, with perhaps just a fleck of black beginning to appear. Then, take it off the heat immediately and pour in the cream. Don’t worry, with some practice you’ll get it just right. And you’ll be glad you did because burnt sugar ice cream of any kind is amazing!

Caramelized bananas = Yum!

This ice cream has only a few ingredients in it, just three if you really pare it down. But all of its simplicity the flavor payoff is phenomenal! Rich and delicious, like a great banana’s foster, only frozen. Try it with a bit of flaky sea salt for that salted caramel flavor.

Bananas Foster Ice Cream

 

Ingredients:

2 ripe bananas (the more brown spots, the better!), mashed

2 cups heavy cream

¾ cup sugar

½ teaspoon vanilla extract

1 tablespoon dark rum

 1.)    Add sugar to a medium saucepan and bring to a boil with about two tablespoons of water added in. Boil, without stirring, until the caramel turns a dark brown. You’re looking for a very dark caramel here, but you don’t want out and out burnt. If your caramel turns black and starts smoking start over; you’re ice cream will taste horrible if you use it.

2.)    Once your caramel turns dark brown, quickly take it off the heat and add the cream. Don’t worry if it roils up and hardens, bring it back to the heat and it will dissolve completely.

3.)    Add in the mashed up banana, rum and vanilla extract and cool until completely chilled. Churn in ice cream maker according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

Make it a Sundae!– This decadent ice cream hardly needs it, but you could take it completely over the top by adding a rum-caramel sauce, fresh whipped cream and toasted pecans. Now that’s a sundae!

The Lighter Side– You substitute half and half for the heavy cream for a less rich ice cream.

A cake made into ice cream!

I was inspired to make this ice cream after looking at a recipe for a very popular Pear and Dried Cherry Frangipane Cake from the December 2003 issue of Bon Appetit Magazine. Here’s the link if you’re interested in the cake-

http://www.epicurious.com/recipes/food/views/Pear-and-Dried-Cherry-Frangipane-Cake-108972

The cake was listed as a part of a Christmas Tree Trimming Party and I thought it looked so perfect for Christmas with its copious nuts and fruits sparkling like plump jewels. I knew I had to see if I could ice-creamify it! I made an almond flavored ice cream base and then added some amaretto macerated dried cherries and some pears lightly sauteed in a bit of butter and a light sprinkling of cinnamon. I actually haven’t made the cake yet, but I’m proud to say that this ice cream twist on the original was very delicious and complex!

The almond infused base.

The word “frangipane” simply refers to any recipe with almonds as the base. Most of the time, an Italian almond paste is used. For my recipe I wanted to infuse the flavor of almonds right into the base of my ice cream. I ended up steeping some toasted almonds with the milk and the cream and then pureeing the mix in a blender before straining the almonds back out. I’ve used this method before in my Hazelnut-Frangelico Ice Cream, and it’s a great way to infuse the base of your ice cream with a rich, nutty flavor. It’s a little extra effort, what with the steeping and the pureeing and all, but the results are completely worth it!

Almonds and cherries and pears- Oh my!

 I wanted to give the dried cherries in this recipe some moisture and extra flavor so I boiled and then let them sit in some Amaretto. This process, also know as maceration, made the cherries plump and juicy and prevented them from freezing rock hard in the ice cream. You could use any alcohol for the maceration process, but Amaretto worked particularly well here as it’s an almond flavored liquer. The Amaretto flavor married very well with both the roasted almonds in the base and the dried cherries.

A Tree-Trimming Ice Cream!

 This ice cream is another great choice for the Christmas season. The flavors of roasted almonds, buttery pears and juicy, Amaretto soaked cherries were perfectly complementary to each other. I think next year I’ll make this ice cream with the cake it was inspired from and serve them together as part of my own tree trimming party! Somehow the nuts and the dried fruits and pears say “Christmas” in a way that seems to be etched into our collective psyche. Like our need for fruitcake at this time of year, despite the fact that almost no one seems to like it! So use that old fruitcake as door jamb or a bookend or an anchor for your yacht and make this fresher and more vibrant homage instead. Season’s Greetings!

Frangipane Ice Cream

 Ingredients:

2 cups almonds, toasted

3 cups half and half

½ cup heavy cream

2/3 cup sugar

6 large egg yolks

pinch of salt

1/3 cup Amaretto or other almond flavored liquor

¼ teaspoon almond extract

1 ripe pear

¼ cup dried cherries

pinch of cinnamon

pat of butter

1.)    Place 1 3/4 cups toasted almonds and half and half in a saucepan over medium heat. Bring to the barest simmer for a few minutes and then cover the mixture, take it off the heat, and let it steep for an hour.

2.)    Pour the almond mixture in two batches into a blender with a sturdy lid. Process in blender until pureed. Then, set a sieve lined with cheesecloth over a medium bowl and carefully pour pureed mixture into sieve. Gently squeeze the cheesecloth to extract as much milk from the mixture as possible, discarding the almond solids. You should have approximately 2 ½ cups of almond milk. If you have less, add more milk or half and half to make up for the desired amount.

3.)    Combine almond milk and heavy cream in a medium saucepan and set over medium heat. Heat until bubbles appear near the rim of the saucepan and steam begins to rinse, but do not let it boil.

4.)    Meanwhile whisk the egg yolks together in a large bowl and gradually add the sugar. Whisk the mixture until the yolks look fluffy and turn a pale yellow color.

5.)    All the while whisking the egg yolk mixture, slowly and gradually add almond milk mixture and when fully emulsified, pour the mixture back into the medium saucepan. Over low heat constantly mix the base with a spatula or wooden spoon until it thickens slightly and can coat the back of a wooden spoon, about 4-5 minutes.

6.)    Immediately remove from heat and transfer to a large bowl. Add the pinch of salt and almond extract and refrigerate 4 hours to overnight. Freeze according to your ice cream machine’s instructions. After freezing, stir in remaining 1/4 cup toasted almonds, sautéed pears and Amaretto cherries. Enjoy!

 Amaretto Cherries

 1.)    Combine dried cherries and Amaretto in a small saucepan. Bring to a boil and simmer for two minutes. Remove from heat and let sit for a few hours. You can make this up to a day ahead.

 Sautéed Pears

 1.) Chop the ripe pear into ½ inch cubes. Sauté in a pan over medium heat with a bit of butter until cooked all the way through and beginning to brown. Add a dash of cinnamon and sprinkling of extra sugar, stirring well. Cool to room temperature.

Make it a sundae!

This flavor is very complex, so I’d be hesitant to add a sauce. I’m afraid a sauce would mask instead of enhancing the rich and complex flavors of this ice cream. I do think that an amaretto, frangelico, or even a bourbon spiked whipped cream would be unbelievably good dolloped on top.

My First Christmas Flavor!

This flavor was inspired by those dinky little Christmas ornaments they make you make in grade school. You know, the ones where your teacher tells you to stick some cloves in a orange and call it decoration? Then you’re left with a slowly rotting orange on your Christmas tree, and many wasted whole cloves that could have been put to good use. So instead of making one of those, why don’t you make my ice cream instead? It’s very Christmassy, with strong seasonal flavors of orange and clove perfuming the sweet cream base. And instead of using cloves to make an ornament that resembles Pinhead from Hellraiser, you actually get to taste the warm and invigorating spice of cloves.

Orange you glad you made this ice cream?

I used the rind of 3-4 oranges to make this ice cream. I like to use rinds over fruit juices when making fruit-based ice creams if I can. Fruit juices, and particularly citrus juices can make an ice cream base icy if you’re not careful. So for this recipe I steeped the grated rind with some warmed milk, which adds a deep orange flavor right into the base of the ice cream. When grating orange rind, it’s best if you have a microplane (see above picture). This kitchen tool will grate orange rind very quickly and easily. If you don’t have one, you could always use a regular fine grater, but it will probably take longer to accomplish this simple task.

Warm milk and orange- like a creamsicle!

For the sweetener in this recipe, I used honey instead of granulated sugar. I made this decision based on another holiday family tradition of mine- Baklava! My mother is Greek, so every year we come together and make this deliciously sticky treat to give away in holiday baskets to friends. And two of the cornerstone flavors of Baklava are cloves and honey. Orange isn’t a traditional flavoring of this dessert, but I think that orange and honey complement each other perfectly. Especially considering that I used a floral orange blossom honey in my ice cream. To tie all the flavors together and pump up the flavor volume, I also added a teaspoon of orange flower water.

The finished product!

This is my first of several Christmas themed ice creams. It was so delicious! The orange and clove flavors worked great together and were a perfect way to kick off the holiday season. Make sure you use a good quality honey, and grind your own cloves and your ice cream will be spectacular! Its honey and spice and everything nice. Enjoy!

Orange Clove Ice Cream Recipe

Ingredients:

1 1/2 cups heavy cream

1 1/2 cups whole milk

½ cup good quality honey, such as wildflower or orange blossom

¼ cup sugar

5  large egg yolks

pinch of salt

12 whole cloves, finely ground,

10 whole cloves, coarsely ground

3-4 oranges

1 teaspoon orange flower water

  1.) Combine milk and heavy cream in a medium saucepan and set over medium heat. Grate oranges directly into the milk.  Heat until bubbles appear near the rim of the saucepan and steam begins to rinse, but do not let it boil. Take off the heat and let steep for at least 1 hour. After steeping, strain the orange rind out of the milk, pressing on rind for the most orange flavor, discard rind. Heat strained milk until steam begins to rise again.

2.)    Meanwhile whisk the egg yolks together in a large bowl and gradually add the sugar and honey. Whisk the mixture until the yolks look fluffy and turn a pale yellow color.

3.)    All the while whisking the egg yolk mixture, slowly and gradually add milk mixture and when fully emulsified, pour the mixture back into the medium saucepan. Over low heat constantly mix the base with a spatula or wooden spoon until it thickens slightly and can coat the back of a wooden spoon, about 6-7 minutes.

4.)    Immediately remove from heat and transfer to a large bowl. Add the pinch of salt, ground cloves and orange flower water and refrigerate 4 hours to overnight. Freeze according to your ice cream machine’s instructions. Enjoy!

Make it a sundae!

Going with the baklava theme, you could easily turn this into a baklava sundae! Gently warm some honey with some cinnamon and toasted, chopped walnuts and drizzle over ice cream. You could even butter some phyllo pieces and bake until golden brown and add that to your sundae as well. Top with softly whipped cream. Yum!

A Sophisticated Treat.

I never planned on making this ice cream. I love cooking seasonally, so I usually confine berry based ice creams and sorbets to summer, when they’ve reach their very zenith of ripe freshness. But truth be told, I love raspberries and strawberries whether or not it’s the middle of July or the dead of winter. What truly inspired me to make this ice cream was the simple fact that pints of raspberries were on sale for only a $1 each at my local supermarket. Where I live, that’s an unheard of, ridiculously low price! I came home from the grocery store with a great bounty of beautiful raspberries and I knew I couldn’t let them go to waste. Flipping through David Lebovitz’s extraodinary ice cream cookbook, The Perfect Scoop, I came across his recipe for a Chocolate Raspberry Ice Cream and was sold on the idea immediately. The dark chocolate with the tart, yet sweet raspberries made for an incredibly rich, luxurious ice cream. This is the tuxedo or the evening gown of frozen desserts. Rich, velvety and luxe- perfect for the sophisticated palate.

Fresh berries!

Even though raspberries aren’t in season right now, I still think that a Chocolate Raspberry Ice Cream qualifies as a fall/winter ice cream. Sure the berries are summery, but for some reason chocolate ice cream always struck me as more of a winter flavor. Speaking of chocolate, this recipe calls for dutch process cocoa. Different from the regular variety, “dutched” cocoa is treated with alkali, which neutralizes acids. The resulting cocoa powder is a bit milder, and darker in color and flavor in comparison to natural, unsweetened cocoa. Unable to find pure dutch process cocoa, I used Hershey’s Special Dark Cocoa Powder, which is a mix of both cocoas. This cocoa worked beautifully, and gave the ice cream a deep, dark chocolate flavor.

My Perfect Scoop!

Part of what makes this ice cream such a treat is the fact that so often the raspberry/chocolate combination can result in a dessert that’s sicky sweet and cloying. Artificial raspberry flavor is truly gross, and tends to taste more like cough syrup than anything found in nature. This ice cream is the opposite of that, using only real, fresh and natural ingredients. When I told a friend that I was making this ice cream she remarked that she didn’t like chocolate and raspberries together. After having one  bite of the finished product she quickly changed her mind.

Haute Ice Cream

I know I say this every week, but this truly has to be up there with my all time greatest ice creams. Once again, David Lebovitz delivered with another fabulous recipe. My family and I enjoyed this so much that we’re planning on using it as a centerpiece dessert after a filet mignon dinner on New Year’s Eve. We’re actually planning on turning it into a deluxe ice cream pie by filling a chocolate cookie crust with the freshly churned ice cream and topping it with a whipped cream/creme fraiche mixture, chocolate shavings and more fresh berries. Yum, I can’t wait!

Recipe adapted from The Perfect Scoop by David Lebovitz

Chocolate-Raspberry Ice Cream

Ingredients:

2 Cups Heavy Cream
7 Tbsp Unsweetened Dutch-process Cocoa Powder
3/4 Cup Sugar
2 3/4 Cups Raspberries, fresh or frozen

½ teaspoon vanilla extract

pinch of salt

 
1.)Whisk together the cream, cocoa powder, salt, vanilla and sugar in a large saucepan. Heat the mixture, whisking frequently, until it comes to a full, rolling boil (it will start to foam up). Remove from the heat and add the raspberries. Cover and let stand for 10 minutes.

2.)Puree the mixture in a food processor or blender. If you wish, press the mixture through a mesh strainer to remove the seeds.

3.) Allow the mixture to chill thoroughly, then freeze it in an ice cream maker.

Make it a Sundae!- Top with hot fudge laced with a few tablespoons or Chambord or Framboise to heighten the rich flavors. Add whipped cream and more fresh raspberries and enjoy!

Lighten Up!– You can substitute half and half for the heavy cream pretty successfully in this recipe.

100_1289

Tart and tangy!

I wasn’t totally sure I was going to post this recipe, to be perfectly honest. I really liked it, and I love the sweet tang of pomegranate. But my sister, and official ice cream taster, wasn’t bowled over by this recipe. But then again, she also isn’t the biggest fan of pomegranates. I would never want to stand behind a recipe that I wasn’t 100% proud of, but ultimately I decided that if you like pomegranates, you’ll like pomegranate ice cream. I thought it was deliciously tangy and sweet at the same time, deriving flavor from a mix of a lush custard base and the additon of thick, sweet-tart pomegranate molasses.

100_1283

A gorgeous fruit.

I got the inspiration for this recipe from my weekly trips to the supermarket where I noticed a large and prominent display of pomegranates. With the fall season being consumed by apple picking and pumpkin patches, it is easy to forget that many other fruits and vegetables also come into season during this bountiful time. Even before I fell in love with the taste, I’ve always thought that pomegranates had to be one of God’s loveliest fruits. Although not particularly exciting on the outside, slice them open and you’ll find a treasure chest of perfectly symmetrical, glistening red jewels. Some biblical scholars even believe that it is the pomegranate and not the apple that tempted Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden. While nothing is worth the loss of paradise, the pomegranate is so lovely and juicy that it is easy to see why our ancestors fell from grace.

Two kinds of pomegranate.

This ice cream recipe uses two types of pomegranate for a maximum in flavor. I was tempted to use pomegranate juice, but even though in would turn the ice cream a pretty pink hue, juices in ice cream always run a high risk of turning out icy. I wasn’t ready to risk structural problems in the ice cream, so I went for practicality and used pomegranate molasses instead, which will turn your ice cream a non-offensive light brown color. Pomegranate molasses is often used in middle eastern cooking, and is available at many large supermarkets and at middle eastern markets or gourmet shops. If you can’t find it, just reduce some pomegranate juice until syrupy, which is exactly what pomegranate molasses is anyway. The “molasses” in its name simply refers to the two product’s similar consistency and color. Beyond that, molasses and pomegranate molasses aren’t related to each other at all.

100_1288

Jewel-like and exotic.

The tangy pomegranate molasses folded into the creamy creme anglaise ice cream base made for a beautiful, exotic and creative homemade ice cream recipe. I could even see it paired next to a scoop of Saffron Ice Cream, for a fragrant taste of the Middle East. You could also add chocolate chips to this ice cream, simulating a popular national brand’s antioxidant boosting premium ice cream pints. Either way, if you love pomegranates, celebrate as I did with this glorious, tangy and striking ice cream recipe.

Pomegranate Ice Cream

Ingredients:

2 cups heavy cream

1 cup whole milk

3/4 cup sugar

6  large egg yolks

pinch of salt

3-4 tablespoons pomegranate molasses, to taste

1 pomegranate- seeds removed

     1.) Combine milk and heavy cream in a medium saucepan and set over medium heat.    Heat until bubbles appear near the rim of the saucepan and steam begins to rinse, but do not let it boil.

2.)    Meanwhile whisk the egg yolks together in a large bowl and gradually add the sugar. Whisk the mixture until the yolks look fluffy and turn a pale yellow color.

3.)    All the while whisking the egg yolk mixture, slowly and gradually add milk mixture and when fully emulsified, pour the mixture back into the medium saucepan. Over low heat constantly mix the base with a spatula or wooden spoon until it thickens slightly and can coat the back of a wooden spoon, about 6-7 minutes.

4.)    Immediately remove from heat and transfer to a large bowl. Add the pinch of salt and pomegranate molasses and refrigerate 4 hours to overnight. Freeze according to your ice cream machine’s instructions. Garnish with pomegranate seeds and enjoy!

Make it a sundae!

You can make the Antioxidant Sundae by topping this ice cream with dark chocolate sauce or bittersweet hot fudge. Top with some toasted almonds and goji berries for a sundae that’s sinfully good for you.