Cold Comfort Ice Cream: Creative Ice Cream Recipes from Snowy New England

Archive for October 2009

In its natural state.

In its natural state.

Just in time for Halloween! I love themes, so of course as Halloween approaches I have to feature some ice creams appropriate to the season. And  regardless, pumpkin ice cream is just plain delicious. It’s like a cold, crustless pumpkin pie and how could that be bad? So put down your carving knife and back away from that jack-o-lantern and make this spooktacular ice cream!

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Pumpkin and spice and everything nice!

I wanted an ice cream that resembled the filling of a pumpkin pie as closely as possible. So taking inspiration from the recipe on the can of pumpkin, I added some evaporated milk, swapped white sugar for brown, and added plenty of egg yolks for that pumpkin custard flavor. When it comes to something as classic as pumpkin pie, I have to say that I’m pretty traditional kinda gal, so I tried to make ice cream as close to the original as possible.

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Freshly churned!

When making this ice cream, you can use canned pumpkin or, if you’re feeling particularly ambitious, roast your own. Just make sure you get a sugar pumpkin, other types of pumpkin can be stringy and flavorless when roasted. Either way, you just want to make sure you have 3/4 cup pumpkin puree.  Also, when comes to adding spices, my measurements are approximations, so feel free to add more or less spices as you see fit.

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Fresh Pumpkin Ice Cream!

This ice cream came out beautifully, creamy and comforting with just enough spice. This is one of those happy occasions where what I had imagined really did come to life. It was an ice cream version of pumpkin pie filling, to the T. And if you really wanted to kick it up notch, you could add pie crust pieces or even pour it into a baked, cooled pie crust for a frozen twist on the original. Either way, this ice cream would be perfect for Halloween, Thanksgiving, or just as a celebration of fall!

Pumpkin Ice Cream

Ingredients:

2 cups half and half

¼ cup heavy cream

¾ cup evaporated milk

3/4 cup brown sugar

6  large egg yolks

pinch of salt

¾ cup pumpkin puree

¾ teaspoon cinnamon

¾ teaspoon ginger

½ teaspoon nutmeg

  1.) Combine half and half, heavy cream and evaporated milk in a medium saucepan and set over medium heat.    Heat until bubbles appear near the rim of the saucepan and steam begins to rinse, but do not let it boil.

2.)    Meanwhile whisk the egg yolks together in a large bowl and gradually add the sugar. Whisk the mixture until the yolks look fluffy and turn a pale yellow color.

3.)    All the while whisking the egg yolk mixture, slowly and gradually add milk mixture and when fully emulsified, pour the mixture back into the medium saucepan. Over low heat constantly mix the base with a spatula or wooden spoon until it thickens slightly and can coat the back of a wooden spoon, about 5-6 minutes.

4.)    Immediately remove from heat and transfer to a large bowl. Add the pinch of salt pumpkin and spices and refrigerate 4 hours to overnight. Freeze according to your ice cream machine’s instructions. Enjoy!

Make it a sundae!

 This might sound strange, but I actually really like chocolate and pumpkin together. This ice cream would taste great with hot fudge drizzled over it and whipped cream. Pumpkin ice cream would also make an amazing sundae with applesauce, toasted pecans and freshly whipped cream layered on top. Trust me, this combination really works.

Lighten up!– To lighten this recipe you could easily convert this recipe into a gelato by swapping the half and half for whole milk.

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Tart and tangy!

I wasn’t totally sure I was going to post this recipe, to be perfectly honest. I really liked it, and I love the sweet tang of pomegranate. But my sister, and official ice cream taster, wasn’t bowled over by this recipe. But then again, she also isn’t the biggest fan of pomegranates. I would never want to stand behind a recipe that I wasn’t 100% proud of, but ultimately I decided that if you like pomegranates, you’ll like pomegranate ice cream. I thought it was deliciously tangy and sweet at the same time, deriving flavor from a mix of a lush custard base and the additon of thick, sweet-tart pomegranate molasses.

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A gorgeous fruit.

I got the inspiration for this recipe from my weekly trips to the supermarket where I noticed a large and prominent display of pomegranates. With the fall season being consumed by apple picking and pumpkin patches, it is easy to forget that many other fruits and vegetables also come into season during this bountiful time. Even before I fell in love with the taste, I’ve always thought that pomegranates had to be one of God’s loveliest fruits. Although not particularly exciting on the outside, slice them open and you’ll find a treasure chest of perfectly symmetrical, glistening red jewels. Some biblical scholars even believe that it is the pomegranate and not the apple that tempted Adam and Eve in the garden of Eden. While nothing is worth the loss of paradise, the pomegranate is so lovely and juicy that it is easy to see why our ancestors fell from grace.

Two kinds of pomegranate.

This ice cream recipe uses two types of pomegranate for a maximum in flavor. I was tempted to use pomegranate juice, but even though in would turn the ice cream a pretty pink hue, juices in ice cream always run a high risk of turning out icy. I wasn’t ready to risk structural problems in the ice cream, so I went for practicality and used pomegranate molasses instead, which will turn your ice cream a non-offensive light brown color. Pomegranate molasses is often used in middle eastern cooking, and is available at many large supermarkets and at middle eastern markets or gourmet shops. If you can’t find it, just reduce some pomegranate juice until syrupy, which is exactly what pomegranate molasses is anyway. The “molasses” in its name simply refers to the two product’s similar consistency and color. Beyond that, molasses and pomegranate molasses aren’t related to each other at all.

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Jewel-like and exotic.

The tangy pomegranate molasses folded into the creamy creme anglaise ice cream base made for a beautiful, exotic and creative homemade ice cream recipe. I could even see it paired next to a scoop of Saffron Ice Cream, for a fragrant taste of the Middle East. You could also add chocolate chips to this ice cream, simulating a popular national brand’s antioxidant boosting premium ice cream pints. Either way, if you love pomegranates, celebrate as I did with this glorious, tangy and striking ice cream recipe.

Pomegranate Ice Cream

Ingredients:

2 cups heavy cream

1 cup whole milk

3/4 cup sugar

6  large egg yolks

pinch of salt

3-4 tablespoons pomegranate molasses, to taste

1 pomegranate- seeds removed

     1.) Combine milk and heavy cream in a medium saucepan and set over medium heat.    Heat until bubbles appear near the rim of the saucepan and steam begins to rinse, but do not let it boil.

2.)    Meanwhile whisk the egg yolks together in a large bowl and gradually add the sugar. Whisk the mixture until the yolks look fluffy and turn a pale yellow color.

3.)    All the while whisking the egg yolk mixture, slowly and gradually add milk mixture and when fully emulsified, pour the mixture back into the medium saucepan. Over low heat constantly mix the base with a spatula or wooden spoon until it thickens slightly and can coat the back of a wooden spoon, about 6-7 minutes.

4.)    Immediately remove from heat and transfer to a large bowl. Add the pinch of salt and pomegranate molasses and refrigerate 4 hours to overnight. Freeze according to your ice cream machine’s instructions. Garnish with pomegranate seeds and enjoy!

Make it a sundae!

You can make the Antioxidant Sundae by topping this ice cream with dark chocolate sauce or bittersweet hot fudge. Top with some toasted almonds and goji berries for a sundae that’s sinfully good for you.

Yogurt is healthy right?

Yogurt is healthy right?

 

To be honest, I’m surprised that I’ve waited this long to include a frozen yogurt to this blog. You see, I really love yogurt. Any kind really. I’ll take it regular or frozen, plain or drizzled with honey or fruity jam. The wonders of yogurt may never cease, because not only is it tasty, but it is also incredibly healthy for you as well. It’s packed with calcium and protein, and may even possess some vodoo magic that eliminates tummy troubles. I mean, forget spinach (sorry Popeye!), but yogurt is the true food of superpowers! I especially love Greek yogurt, which naturally I used in this recipe. You must try it if you haven’t already. It’s so creamy and rich that you’ll think you’re eating ice cream for breakfast. Which is really my goal, but sadly even I can’t bring myself to do. Pie for breakfast? You bet! Cake? Just a breakfast muffin with yummy frosting on top. Try as I might though, I can’t justify waking up to hot fudge sundae first thing in the morning. So that’s where yogurt comes in.

For this frozen yogurt, I wanted to create a frozen treat concocted from my beloved Fage Greek Yogurt that tasted as rich and decadent as it is healthy. The deep, dark chocolate contrasted beautifully with the tang of the yogurt and created a frozen yogurt that was as dense and nutty as a confection.

 

The melted chocolate.

The melted chocolate.

 

One of my criticisms of many commercial chocolate ice creams and frozen yogurts is that they so seldom taste like dark or semisweet chocolate. I think that what happens is that the chocolate combines with the milk and cream to create, well, milk chocolate. Which is fine if that’s what you want. But if you are craving that deep, dark luscious hit of chocolate flavor you know that milk chocolate won’t cut it. To this end, I think yogurt really helps in complementing, and not diluting, the chocolate flavor. The creamy tang of Greek yogurt really brings out the rich and not-too-sweet components of dark, bittersweet chocolate.

 

Chocolate and almonds!

Chocolate and almonds!

 

In addition to the melted chocolate, I also used some cocoa powder in this frozen yogurt. Using two types of chocolate makes for a greater depth of flavor and cocoa also provides a pleasing texture or “mouthfeel”. I included almonds because one of my absolute favorite candies is dark chocolate almond bark. You can substitute another type of toasted nut if you’d like, but I encourage you to try it with roasted almonds. I was surprised at how much the almonds added to the overall flavor of the frozen yogurt. When I occasionally got a bite without a nut in it I was struck by how much the roasty warmth of the almonds enhanced chocolate flavor.

 

Easy and so good!

Easy and so good!

 

This frozen yogurt packed a wallop of chocolate flavor for a bare minimum of effort. All you have to do is buy Greek yogurt and whisk in some melted chocolate, cocoa and sugar. After you pour it into your ice cream machine, the hardest part about this recipe may be the wait for it to finish churning! So little effort, and the rewards are so rich. Try it someday when your inner choco-holic is raging and you’re too lazy to make chocolate ice cream. Packed with calcium, protein, and antioxidants, you’ll be satisfying a craving and doing right by your body at the same time.

Chocolate Almond Frozen-Yogurt

 

 Ingredients:

 

3 cups of whole milk Greek Yogurt, such as Fage or Chobani

6 oz. of semi or bittersweet chocolate

3-4 tablespoons of cocoa powder

1/2  to 3/4 cups of sugar

1 teaspoon of vanilla extract

½ teaspoon kosher salt

½ cup roasted almonds

 

 1.)    Melt chocolate carefully in microwave or over a double boiler until melted, being careful not to burn or scorch it.

2.)    Whisk yogurt, sugar to taste, vanilla extract, salt and cocoa powder together until smooth.

3.)    Then, quickly whisk in the melted chocolate. If you don’t work quickly, the chocolate may not fully incorporate into the yogurt, but don’t worry if this happens. The melted chocolate will turn into tiny straciatella, or chocolate flecks, and your overall frozen yogurt will still be delicious.

4.)    At this point, taste test your base and correct for more sugar or cocoa powder as needed. I kept ingredient measurements loose, as this can be up to the individual’s personal taste.

5.)    Pour into ice cream machine and churn until frozen. This will take less time than your average ice cream, as the yogurt is very thick to begin with.

6.)    Stir in almonds and enjoy!

 

Make it a Sundae– You could easily make an amazing Rocky Road sundae with this frozen yogurt. Top it with hot fudge and marshmallow sauce, sprinkle with more roasted almonds and chocolate chips and finish with whipped cream. Wowza!

 

Lighten up!- You could easily substitute 2% or even 0% fat Greek yogurt in the place of the whole milk variety.

Saffron Threads of Glory.

Saffron Threads of Glory.

 

I have to admit, I initially had some doubts about this one. Especially after one not-so-encouraging family member remarked that it would probably turn into paella ice cream. But I was intrigued by this flavor’s beautiful color, and encouraged by the fact that it is a much loved and time honored flavor in many parts of the world. Millions of people across generations can’t be wrong right? Well sometimes they are, but not in this case! This ice cream was so good! Exotic without being too “out there”. Fragrant, slightly floral, sweet and satisfying.

 

The saffron in its milky bath.

The saffron in its milky bath.

 

This recipe requires taking a few hours to let the saffron steep in the milk, cream and sugar. This allows the saffron to bloom and releases its delicious flavor and gorgeous, vibrant yellow color. My photography doesn’t even fully capture the amazing pop of sunny yellow color of this ice cream. Just remember to plan ahead, the important steeping step will take a little longer to prepare than your typical custard based ice cream.

 

So colorful!

So colorful!

 

After the saffron steeps, you carefully take out the saffron threads and reserve them as the precious powerhouses of flavor that they are. Then you heat the milk up and add it some whisked egg yolks, which just makes the ice cream base even brighter. Put the whole mixture back of low heat to finish up the base and let cool. Then you’re ready to roll!

 

Exotic and lovely.

Exotic and lovely.

 

When I took my first bite, I was bowled over at what a great flavor this is. It is so good that the only reason I can think of that this ice cream is not more commonplace is the expense of the saffron. And I can’t really argue with that.  Saffron is, after all, the most expensive spice in the world. However, I was able to find some good saffron for a relatively cheap price at my local Trader Joe’s. So fear not intrepid fellow ice cream makers on a budget! This ice cream does not have to be so cost prohibitive.

 

The call me mellow yellow...

They call me mellow yellow...

 

This ice cream was such a success, that even the aformentioned saffron naysayer turned into an instant convert after one bite. I could definitely see myself serving this as a finale to an Indian or Middle Eastern meal. I think any guests to such an occasion would be delighted by the ice cream’s electric hue and creamy, fragrant flavor. There is a reason why saffron is known the world round as the most precious and prized of spices. This glowing ice cream is proof of the fact that saffron really does make everything better!

 

Saffron Ice Cream

 

Ingredients:

 

1 teaspoon saffron threads

1 3/4 cups heavy cream

1 3/4 cups whole milk

2/3 cup sugar

6 large egg yolks

pinch of salt

 

1.)    Place and milk, cream, sugar and saffron in a saucepan over medium heat. Bring to the barest simmer for a few minutes and then cover the mixture, take it off the heat, and let it steep for an hour or two.

 2.)    Gently remove saffron threads from warm milk mixture, saving for later. Heat saffron milk in a medium saucepan and set over medium heat. Heat until bubbles appear near the rim of the saucepan and steam begins to rinse, but do not let it boil.

 3.)    Meanwhile vigorously whisk the egg yolks together in a large bowl for a few minutes.

 4.)    All the while whisking the egg yolks, slowly and gradually add the saffron milk mixture and when fully emulsified, pour the mixture back into the medium saucepan. Over low heat constantly mix the base with a spatula or wooden spoon until it thickens slightly and can coat the back of a wooden spoon, about 6-7 minutes.

 5.)    Immediately remove from heat and transfer to a large bowl, mix in the reserved saffron threads. Add the pinch of salt and refrigerate 4 hours to overnight. Freeze according to your ice cream machine’s instructions.  

 

Make it a sundae!

 

 This ice cream would be delicious and stunning with warmed honey drizzled on top and chopped green pistachios glimmering against the ice cream like emeralds on gold.

The marriage of two awesome desserts!

The marriage of two awesome desserts!

 

I know, I know, another apple ice cream.  After the postings about the Buttermilk Custard Apple Ice Cream and the Roasted Apple Calvados Ice Cream, do you really need another ice cream with apples in it? Well, the answer is a most emphatic yes!  And for supporting evidence I submit to you this photo:

 

The appeal should be obvious.

The appeal should be obvious.

 

While I do love to keep things seasonal with my ice cream, this combination is a no brainer and is delicious really at any time of year. It’s the combination of two of my favorite desserts and a natural extension of apple crisp a la mode. And depending on what kind of fruit is in season, you can make all kinds of delicious substititions for the apples. The middle of July? Substitute peaches. Spring has sprung? Rhubarb would be a scrumptious alternative. No matter how you whip it up, this adaptable ice cream is really the best of both worlds.

 

The importance of crust pieces.

On the importance of crust pieces.

 

Apple Crisp Ice Cream is hardly a new flavor, but what I think sets my flavor apart is the insertion of crumbly, buttery homemade crisp crust streusel pieces. Every time I see this flavor at ice cream stands I’m filled with wild hope that perhaps, this time, the advertised apple crisp ice cream will be dotted with large chunks of crust pieces. But alas, my heart is so often broken. In my mind, to not include crust or streusel topping pieces is just plain false advertising. How can it possibly be apple crisp without the “crisp”? I guess it’s true that when you want something done right you have to do it yourself and ice cream is no exception.

 

Crumbly good!

Crumbly good!

 I know that everyone has a favorite apple crisp recipe, so you can insert any crisp topping you want for this recipe. Just make the topping of the crisp, and pop it in the oven sans apple filling. If you are looking for a good recipe, I would definitely point you in the direction of the Barefoot Contessa/Ina Garten. Her crisp recipes, like pretty much everything else she makes, are delicious and foolproof.

 

Tasty!

Tasty!

 

This flavor is really a classic that you have to try. As delicious as homemade ice cream and apple crisp are separately, together they somehow become more than the sum of their parts. You get the cool, sweet cream flavor and then the oaty, buttery crunch of the streusel and then a burst of fresh fruit flavor from the cinnamon apples. Basically it’s the very best apple crisp a la mode you’ve ever tasted. And another fantastic flavor for fall!

Apple Crisp Ice Cream

 

Ingredients:

 2/3 cup sugar

2 eggs

1 ½ cups whole milk

1 ½ cups heavy cream, preferably unhomogenized

Streusel/Crisp Topping (recipe follows)

Cinnamon Apples (recipe follows

 

1.)    Whisk eggs together in a large bowl for a few minutes. Then, gradually add the sugar to the eggs, all the while whisking. Add the milk and cream and whisk until well mixed. Pour into ice cream machine and churn according to manufacturer’s instructions. When ice cream is finished churning, fold in the crumbled streusel topping and cinnamon apples.

 

Crisp/Streusel Pieces

Adapted from Ina Garten’s Peach and Raspberry Crisp Recipe

Ingredients:

1 ½ cups flour

1 cup granulated sugar

½ cup brown sugar

¼ teaspoons Salt

½ lb. cold unsalted butter, diced

Combine 1 1/2 cups flour, 1 cup granulated sugar, 1/2 cup brown sugar, salt, oatmeal, and the cold, diced butter in the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with a paddle attachment. Mix on low speed until the butter is pea-sized and the mixture is crumbly. Bake for until the top is browned and crisp and golden. Let cool and then crumble and refrigerate.  

 

To make Cinnamon-Apples, large dice, peel and core 2 apples, then add them to a medium skillet over medium heat with a pat of butter. Sautee until fully cooked and starting to brown, then take off the heat and add a sprinkling of sugar and cinnamon to taste. Cool completely.

 

Make it a Sundae! – This ice cream would taste unbelievably good with a caramel or butterscotch sauce drizzled over it. You could even add some cinnamon and toasted walnuts to the sauce to really compliment the flavors of the ice cream. Reduced maple syrup and toasted walnuts, aka wet walnut sauce would be an equally delicious option. Just remember, it’s not a sundae without the whipped cream!

A Classic.

It's a classic for a reason, people.

 

I know what your thinking. Or at least I think I do. Chocolate chip ice cream? How boring, why would anyone want to blog about that? Well, for me this ice cream was anything but boring. Last year, I was diagnosed with Interstitis Cystisis, a painful inflammation of the bladder. In addition to the condition being, well, a pain in the bladder, I also had to radically change my diet. Amongst other things, I was forced to cut out chocolate for an entire year. But I’m so happy and overwhelmingly grateful to report that I’ve been symptom free for over 5 months now. This ice cream marks my return to normalcy after being in the grips of disease. I am tiptoeing towards absolutely no diet restrictions, and let me tell you, those little chocolate chips never tasted so good. And just objectively speaking, when all of the elements are just right, this ice cream is no less than sublime.

 

I've got the golden ticket!

I've got the golden ticket!

 

In this recipe, with precious few ingredients, it is so important to use the best. This recipe is an uncooked, Philadelphia style ice cream. With this type of recipe, the quality of the cream you use really matters, so if possible purchase milk and cream that’s once pasteurized and hasn’t been homogenized. I’ve used brands such as Skytop Farms with great success,  available at Whole Foods Market. The quality of the chocolate you use makes a huge difference as well. Try to buy a high quality brand with the cocoa solids and cocoa butter being between 60 and 70 percent. No matter what kind of chocolate you use though, it will be delicious and still infinitely better than commercial brands. Have you ever picked up a carton that described the ice cream as having “Chocolaty Chips”? Its that extra “ty” on the end of chocolate that scares me, I mean what kind of substance is this exactly? Pretty suspicious if you ask me.

 

Chocolate chips!

Chocolate chips!

 

Instead of using actual chocolate chips that come in a bag, I prefer to buy a bar of semi or bittersweet chocolate and chop it into little cubes. In a more brash flavor like rocky road, you’d definitely want large chunks of mix-ins. Chocolate chip is a classic though, a demure and timeless lady and deserves something a little more refined. I like the nubbly texture of lots of tiny little chocolate cubes nestled in the sweet cream.

 

Simple and perfect.

Simple and perfect.

 

As much as I love to try new flavors, sometimes a return to a classic can be just as relevatory. This has always been one of my favorite flavors and I’m so overjoyed to be able to enjoy it again. In addition to having a tremendous flavor, this was just comforting and simple and good. It reminded me of my childhood, and I was amazed at how an ice cream could feel so warming. Even if you haven’t abstained from chocolate for a whole year, I think this perennial favorite will have the same effect on you.

Chocolate Chip Ice Cream

 

Ingredients:

 

2/3 cup sugar

2 eggs

1 ½ cups whole milk

2 cups heavy cream, preferably unhomogenized and once pasteurized

High quality semi or bittersweet chocolate, finely chopped

 

1.)    Whisk eggs together in a large bowl for a few minutes. Then, gradually add the sugar to the eggs, all the while whisking. Add the milk and cream and whisk until well mixed. Pour into ice cream machine and churn according to manufacturer’s instructions. When ice cream is finished churning, fold in the chocolate chips.

 

Make it a Sundae!– I like this ice cream for its simplicity, so I ate it unadorned, but if you want to this ice cream would make a smashing sundae. I think it would be phenomenal scooped on top of a brownie and topped with hot fudge or caramel sauce and homemade whipped cream.

 

Lighten Up!– You can substitute light cream for the heavy cream or replace both the milk and cream with half and half.

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One of my all time favorites!

One of my all time favorites!

 

This ice cream recipe is absolutely addictive, trust me. The word “burnt” in the title of any ice cream recipe might sound odd and unappetizing, but I can assure you it is nothing of the sort. I first sampled this flavor at Christina’s Ice Cream, a popular ice cream shop in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Usually any food that’s burned tastes charred and bitter, but the burnt sugar in this recipe is more akin to the crackly, caramelized topping of a creme brulee. It’s absolutely spectacular!

 

Watch the sugar closely!

Watch the sugar closely!

 

You start with boiling a simple syrup, just sugar and water. I’ve got to be honest here, this part is sort of intense. Making caramel, or in this case burnt sugar, is not for the faint of heart! But never fear, if you watch your caramel closely and don’t turn your back you’ll be fine. Eventually your simple syrup will start to turn golden, and then caramel colored. This is where the tricky part comes in. You want to add the cream and milk when the color of caramel turns to a deep, mahogany brown. I’ll even wait until I can see little black specks starting to form in the bottom of the pan. The darker the better, but don’t wait too long though. There’s a fine line between a sophisticated taste and a caramel that is truly black, smoky and burnt. If this happens to you, start over or else your ice cream will taste bitter.

 

Doesn't it look like Jello Butterscotch Pudding?

Doesn't it look like Jello Butterscotch Pudding?

 

Once your caramel turns dark brown, take it quickly off the heat and then slowly add the milk and cream. Watch out, because most of the time the addition of the milk will make the mixture bubble up. For this reason it’s probably best to use a high sided pan for this recipe. Don’t worry if the burnt sugar roils up and hardens at first, keep stirring and it will incorporate itself to create a beautiful butterscotch colored ice cream base.  From here on in, the thrill ride is over as all you have to do is whisk the warmed milk into some egg yolks. Piece of cake.  And ice cream

 

Golden Delicious!

Golden Delicious!

 

You can also add a delicious (and very French) twist to this recipe by adding some kosher salt to the base to create a salted caramel flavor. Salted caramels are very trendy right now, but I have to say that as trends go, this one is a keeper. Personally, I think this ice cream is perfection with a little bit of flaky sea salt sprinkled on the top. The salt really picks up and explodes the flavors without tasting “salty”.  

 

So. Good.

So. Good.

 

Burnt Sugar Ice Cream has become quite popular at local ice cream shops in the Boston area. Actually, the flavor has outright groupies who never order any other flavor!  So I hope you make this recipe at home and see for yourself what all the fuss is about. This is homemade ice cream at its best!

Burnt Sugar Ice Cream

Ingredients:

1 ¾ cups heavy cream

1 ½ cups whole milk

1 cup white sugar

5  large egg yolks

pinch of salt

 

 1.)    Combine sugar with 3 tablespoons water in a medium saucepan. Boil over medium heat, and watch very closely until mixture turns into a dark brown caramel. Watch carefully, if the caramel color is too pale, you will lose the unique and sophisticated flavor of burnt caramel. Don’t wait too long however, or your caramel will burn outright, making for a bitter and inedible ice cream base. If the sugar turns black and starts to smoke, discard and start over.

 2.)    When caramel is ready, quickly take it off the heat and then slowly add the cream and milk. Whisk until the mixture incorporates completely. Don’t worry if sugar roils and hardens, it will soon completely combine with the milk.

 3.)    Meanwhile whisk the egg yolks together in a large bowl.

 4.)    All the while whisking the egg yolk mixture, slowly and gradually add milk mixture and when fully emulsified, pour the mixture back into the medium saucepan. Over low heat constantly mix the base with a spatula or wooden spoon until it thickens slightly and can coat the back of a wooden spoon, about 6-7 minutes.

 5.)    Immediately remove from heat and transfer to a large bowl. Add the pinch of salt and refrigerate 4 hours to overnight. Freeze according to your ice cream machine’s instructions. Enjoy!

 Make it a sundae!

 Chocolate sauce or hot fudge would be divine with this ice cream, although to be honest this complex flavor needs little more accompaniment that a sprinkling or flaky sea salt. On occasion though, I have been known to eat this ice cream with a generous dollop of freshly and softly whipped cream and I can’t say it hurt.

 The lighter side– Feel to substitute whole milk or half and half for heavy cream in this recipe. If anything it will only make the flavors more intense, which is the reason gelati is often made this way in Italy.